Scams Are Rampant – In May Samuel Yates of Maude Texas

In May, Samuel Yates of Maude Texas, was arrested by federal authorities in the Eastern District of Texas and charged with demanding millions of dollars in loans for people affected by the VIDO pandemic.19 In documents filed with the U.S. District Court, investigators alleged that Yates found a random name generator he online to create a list of fictional workers for his company in order to obtain a low-interest loan under the Wage Protection Program. The article cites Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, who warned residents about a scheme where con artists posing as City Plant workers claimed that water pipes had been poisoned by the coronavirus to gain access to their homes. Patrick said Gulf prosecutors have extensive experience in investigating and prosecuting “natural disaster fraud”. “The region has been hit by a series of devastating hurricanes in recent years,” said Brown of Texas East District, who is trying to access emergency funds when the government spends large sums of money. In addition to the scam, the U.S. Justice Department has also arrested white-collar crime suspects on charges of loan fraud under the government’s payroll protection program. Patrick partnered with District Attorney Harris Vince Ryan to warn the people of Houston about the scam, Click2Houston reported. According to investigators, the scammers took advantage of the insecurity of people whose lives were disrupted during the pandemic. Our lawyers in Dallas have extensive experience representing defendants in federal courts for these complex crimes. Federal authorities accuse Yates of “owning” a company with over 400 employees and a monthly salary of $2 million. Authorities recently warned that criminals are using fear of the coronavirus to deceive Texans through text messages, email, phone calls and personal conversations. Mr. Ryan urged people to be sceptical of any warning against VOCID-19. The original application was for $5 million in loans, according to investigators who, according to media reports, dug into Yates’ garbage. Fraudsters thrive in times of economic uncertainty and hardship, and the VOCID-19 pandemic is no exception. Economic crimes are often linked to fraud and often lead to multiple charges.

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